Monthly Archives: November 2018

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Car Accidents During Heavy Rain

Nevada is a land of extremes. Along with hot, dry weather, the state also experiences tremendous thunder storms that bring with them exceptionally heavy rain. According to statistics compiled by the U.S. Department of Transportation, rain and wet pavement combined account nation-wide for about 26% of vehicle crashes, 25% of crash injuries, and 21% of crash fatalities. About half of weather-related injuries on the road are caused by rain. Heavy rain dramatically increases the risks of driving. In a sudden downpour visibility can rapidly drop to almost nothing, obscuring cars and other obstacles in front of the vehicle. Heavy rain also covers the roadway in a layer of water that can dramatically reduce vehicles’ contact with the road, leading to hydroplaning and loss of control. These factors are considerably more dangerous on busy roads like those in the Las Vegas area, because drivers can react to heavy rain in unpredictable ways. Few drivers are accustomed to driving in downpours. The unfamiliar conditions and relative lack of consistent safety principles turns other drivers into additional hazards. Drivers may brake suddenly, which increases the chance of hydroplaning and may force following drivers to do likewise. Alternatively, drivers may not take the danger seriously, perhaps because they are overconfident about their vehicles’ ability to handle the wet conditions. Drivers who find themselves in heavy rain should take several precautions:
  • Slow down. Rather than waiting for the cars in front to slow, it’s best to be among the drivers to reduce speed. Pay attention to the following distance of the car behind and tap the brakes if necessary to get the other car’s driver to back off.
  • Turn on lights. A car without lights on can vanish in a downpour.
  • Try to maintain a safe following distance. Water on the roadway dramatically increases stopping distance. Giving the car in front an extra cushion is an important way of avoiding accidents.
  • If necessary, stop. If rain is so heavy that visibility is completely gone, one should assume that the roadway is also heavy with water. Stopping completely may be the best course. If doing so, turning on hazard lights is a good extra precaution.
In the event of an accident during heavy rains, the important thing is to stay safe.
  • Oncoming traffic will pose an ongoing hazard until traffic patterns have adjusted to accommodate for the accident.
  • Emergency personnel may arrive more slowly due to the weather.
  • If vehicles are stopped in an area that is flooded or may become flooded (meaning more than 6 to 10 inches of water), it may be necessary to leave the vehicle to avoid being caught in a flash flood.
Anyone who has been seriously injured in a car crash should talk to a personal injury lawyer as soon as possible. The law firm of Greenman Goldberg Raby Martinez has represented clients in auto accident cases for over 45 years. If you have been injured in an accident during heavy rains, please give us a call today for a free attorney consultation. We can be reached at 702-388-4476 or through our contacts page.

Handling Embarrassing and Damaging Facts in Litigation

People who have suffered personal injury or other harms sometimes are reluctant to pursue legal action because they are reluctant to reveal embarrassing or incriminating details about themselves in a court setting. The facts of the incident leading to an injury may include damaging information about the injured plaintiff, such as drug use, extramarital affairs, or behavior that is prohibited by an employer. A significant part of an attorney’s job is to understand how these concerns may play a role in a case’s strategy and help the client evaluate when and where such concerns should be allowed to take precedence over other tactical concerns. One thing every potential plaintiff should bear in mind is that very few civil disputes ever go to trial. Most often, private disputes such as personal injury cases get resolved through settlement negotiations. Although such cases still involve filing court documents that can contain damaging facts about the plaintiff, they may avoid the biggest fear many plaintiffs have, of having to air their dirty laundry in a public setting, before a jury. Broadly speaking, whether a “bad fact” can be avoided in litigation will depend on its importance. Some kinds of information simply can’t be “hidden” during a legal proceeding, because they are vital to the core issues in a case. Such facts can form a key part of the defense, or they may be an unavoidable part of the story the plaintiff must tell to not be accused of dishonesty. For example, if the plaintiff was drunk while crossing against a red light, it’s unlikely that the drunkenness won’t come up, even if the defendant was speeding and texting at the time his car hit the plaintiff. The fact that the plaintiff was drinking may not be particularly damaging, or it may present serious issues (for example, if the plaintiff is an emergency medical technician and was on call at the time of the accident). Other information may have some marginal value to a plaintiff’s case, but its potentially damaging effects to the plaintiff’s personal or professional life outweigh the benefits of introducing it. Whether such information can be kept out of the legal process will depend on whether the adverse party knows about it, and whether it is relevant to a legitimate discovery request. In some situations both parties may want to keep bad facts hidden. The case of the extramarital affair offers a simple example. If the cheating couple was meeting for a liaison when one of them accidentally struck the other with a car, the purpose of their getting together might be best left off the table. The adversarial nature of litigation means that the other side of the case will always want to find the most damaging information it can to help build its case. In theory an attorney has an ethical obligation to not blackmail the other side into agreeing to a low settlement offer, but not every lawyer is ethical. It’s important for clients to clearly explain to their attorney all of their concerns about the case before it gets started, so the attorney can set expectations about what matters can be kept private and what disclosures might be unavoidable. For over 45 years the law firm of Greenman Goldberg Raby Martinez has represented Las Vegas clients in personal injury, workers’ compensation, and auto accident cases. We help clients sort out the pros and cons of different strategies, taking into account all aspects of each client’s individual needs and concerns. Call us today for a free, confidential attorney consultation. We can be reached at 702-388-4476 or send us a request through our site.

Can Workers Sue Employers for Especially Dangerous Conditions at Work?

Some jobs are inherently dangerous. Firefighting, heavy construction, and police work are just a few examples of high-risk professions. Employers in these professions take steps to mitigate the dangers their employees face. Beyond the clear importance of protecting their valued employees from harm, employers also want to avoid the expense of an injured employee (in terms of lost time, insurance, disability accommodations, and so on) and the potential regulatory and media attention that can come from serious accidents. But at what point can employees sue employers for dangerous conditions at work? State and federal safety laws and regulations provide broad guidelines for workplace safety. Enforced by the federal and state Occupational Safety and Health Administrations (OSHA), these rules cover most types of high-risk conditions at work. Specific rules address things like workplace air quality, use of ladders, design and use of heavy equipment, and electrical work. In addition to specific rules, state and federal laws also feature what is called the “general duty clause.” This clause requires employers to provide workplaces that are “free from recognized hazards that are causing or likely to cause death or serious physical harm.” 29 U.S.C. § 654(a)(1), NRS 618.375(1). The primary means of addressing workplace safety concerns is to submit a complaint to the Nevada Department of Business and Industry. If the agency determines that a complaint has merit it will arrange for an inspection of the workplace. Findings from the inspection will be reported to the employer, which has a certain amount of time to resolve the dangerous conditions. If the employer fails to adequately address the problem the agency may take enforcement action against the employer to ensure that noncompliant conditions are resolved. It’s important to note that employees can’t sue to enforce OSHA rules on their own. Instead, workers who file OSHA complaints or who refuse to work in unreasonably dangerous conditions are protected against retaliation by their employers. If an employer fires an employee under such circumstances it may be liable in a lawsuit for wrongful termination. An employee considering these steps should consult with an attorney to craft a sound strategy. What about workers who are injured at work by unaddressed safety conditions? Even in these situations a worker’s ability to sue the employer may be limited. Workplace injuries are covered by Nevada’s workers’ compensation system, which has two critical features for this analysis. First, workers’ compensation is a no-fault system, meaning that the worker’s injuries are covered without consideration for who or what is responsible for the injury. Second, an employer that purchases workers’ compensation insurance ordinarily cannot be sued for personal injury unless the employer deliberately caused the injury or doesn’t carry enough insurance to cover the kinds of risks that its employees face. For more than 45 years the law firm of Greenman Goldberg Raby Martinez has helped clients in the Las Vegas area with workplace injuries. If you are concerned about dangerous conditions at your job and you’d like to understand how your legal rights may be affected by taking action to resolve them, call us today for a free attorney consultation. We can be reached at 702-388-4476, or ask us to call you through our contact page.

The Dangers of Power Outages During Hot Weather

Hot weather in a place like Nevada can create life-threatening conditions. When a power interruption turns off air conditioners, the interiors of Nevada homes can quickly become dangerously hot. People in at-risk populations should be especially mindful of how heat can be harmful to them. But their loved ones should also keep in mind that when the power goes out, a vulnerable person may need help getting out of the heat.

Heath risks of exposure to excessive heat

People who stay too long in hot environments can suffer a range of potentially serious health effects. This is especially true of infants and toddlers under the age of four, and seniors over the age of 65. It is also true of people with other health conditions, such as obesity, and people who take certain drugs or who abuse alcohol. Heat exhaustion is a common consequence of overheating. It is characterized by heavy sweating and a rapid pulse, and can be accompanied by dizziness, headache, nausea, and other symptoms. If left untreated, heat exhaustion can turn into heatstroke, a potentially life-threatening condition. A person with heatstroke has a body temperature of 104 degrees Fahrenheit or higher, and may act confused, suffer seizures, or fall into a coma. If someone is suffering from heatstroke it’s essential to call 911 right away. The condition can be mitigated by placing the person in a bathtub filled with cold water, spraying them with a garden hose, or by using ice, but “home remedies” should not be relied upon to solve the issue.

Can a utility be sued for damages arising from a power outage?

Power interruptions can cause a lot of problems: spoiled food, voltage spikes that destroy electronics, and so on. But heat-related deaths are probably the most dramatic and tragic potential consequences. A public utility may be legally liable for injuries that arise form a power outage, but to prevail a plaintiff seeking compensation must be able to prove that the utility was negligent, and that this negligence was the legal (or proximate) cause of the plaintiff’s injury. What sort of facts might support a claim of negligence? This can be a tricky question to answer. For starters, the plaintiff probably must establish that the utility knew something about the risk of power outage before the event, but didn’t take reasonable steps to address the problem. For example, it may be negligence if a power pole has been leaning dangerously for some time and the utility has simply ignored it. In reality such facts are rare, because utilities routinely inspect their lines to prevent more expensive problems from arising. As a rule, each case needs to be analyzed according to its specific facts.

GGRM is a Las Vegas personal injury law firm

For more than 45 years the law firm of Greenman Goldberg Raby Martinez has represented Las Vegas clients in personal injury cases. If a power outage has caused you or someone you love to suffer a serious injury, call us today to explore your legal options. For a free attorney consultation about your case call us today at 702-388-4476 or send us a request through our site.

Flash Floods Pose Serious Danger to Backcountry Adventurers

In a climate as dry as Nevada’s it can be tempting to give little thought to the possibility of flooding while planning a backcountry trip. But floods can happen quickly, and for a variety of reasons. Flash floods are among the leading causes of weather-related deaths in the United States. With a good understanding of what causes flash floods and locations to avoid during conditions that cause them, hikers, campers, and off-roaders can protect themselves from potentially serious dangers.

What causes flash floods?

Flash floods can happen wherever the right mix of water supply and poor drainage combine to produce a significant buildup of water. In Nevada, the risk of flash floods is especially high in dry creek beds and washes. These natural pathways for water drainage can be hard to see sometimes, in part because they can be quite large. Campers sometimes get caught in flash floods after pitching tents in a wash—the relatively flat, clear ground seems like an ideal place to rest. A common cause of flash flooding is torrential rain from thunderstorms. Depending on how quickly a storm is moving, a thunderstorm can drop a lot of water in a concentrated spot over a very short time. Flash floods have also been known to be caused by melting snow and less common phenomena like broken dams and levees.

Protecting yourself from flood risk

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAH) has three straightforward points about flood safety:
  1. In the event of a flood, get to higher ground. For backcountry enthusiasts, a corollary to this rule is the idea that low ground in general is to be avoided as a place for camping. This is especially true if there are signs of storms anywhere on the horizon, but always bear in mind that storms can arise quickly and in the middle of the night.
  2. Do not drive or walk into flooded areas. Many of the deaths caused by flash floods occur because people make the mistake of driving their cars into a flooded area and get stuck. Flood waters can rise extremely fast and can carry huge objects like boulders and whole tress with them over long distances. A passenger car can be carried away in surprisingly shallow water.
  3. Stay informed. Before heading into the backcountry find out what the weather in the area will be doing during your trip. Pay attention to the chance of rain anywhere upstream of where you’ll be. Flood waters can travel a long distance in a short time.
With rare exceptions, everyone who is in the backcountry is responsible for their own safety. Unless a landowner is charging a fee for people to use the land for recreation, landowners (including government agencies) have no duty to keep property safe for recreational use. Among other things, that means that potential sites for flash floods aren’t likely to be highlighted with signs or other kinds of warning. The law firm of Greenman Goldberg Raby Martinez represents clients in the Las Vegas area in personal injury cases. If you have questions about your legal options after suffering injuries during a flash flood, please reach out to us today for a free attorney consultation. We can be reached at 702-388-4476 or through our contacts page.

NutriBullet Class Action Raises Explosion Concerns

Capital Brands, the maker of the popular NutriBullet line of high-speed blenders, has been sued by a various plaintiffs who claim that the blenders caused injuries by exploding unexpectedly. The suits allege that pressure builds up inside the blender during operation. The pressure can cause the canister to explode, sending hot liquid and other contents into the air. A recent suit also alleges that the blender’s blade assembly can be forcefully ejected from the unit as a consequence of the pressure buildup, threatening serious injury to users. The latest string of explosion-related lawsuits is not the first time the NutriBullet has come under scrutiny for potential safety problems. In 2014 Consumer Reports gave the NutriBullet Pro 900 model a “Don’t Buy” rating due to concerns that the blender’s blades could come loose and cause choking or internal cuts. The rating was later lifted after the product was redesigned. Cases against Capital Brands have focused on the company’s failure to warn consumers about the potential dangers of explosions. This could be an important component in any case brought in Nevada. A typical consumer products liability claim in Nevada focuses on whether a product was defective at the time it left the defendant manufacturer’s possession. To prevail the consumer must have used the product in a reasonably foreseeable way and been injured by the product’s latent defect. People in Nevada who use NutriBullet products should take steps to avoid being injured by their blenders. First, watch for recalls covering your blender. If Capital Brands is found liable for injuries that have given rise to lawsuits it may voluntarily recall some products to avoid future lawsuits. Although a recall doesn’t necessarily affect a manufacturer’s liability for defective products, it is much better to avoid being injured at all than to suffer an injury and then seek compensation. Second, be sure to follow instructions with care. Capital Brands has modified its instruction manuals to caution users against certain types of pressure buildup and the risks of putting hot materials inside the blender. It’s important to follow these instructions to avoid injury. These instructions may also give the company a way to limit its liability in some situations. Someone who has been injured while using a NutriBullet should consult with a personal injury attorney as soon as possible after the incident. For over 45 years the law firm of Greenman Goldberg Raby Martinez has represented clients in personal injury and products liability cases. We are here to answer your questions about injuries caused by defective or unreasonably dangerous products. For a free attorney consultation call us today at 702-388-4476 or ask us to reach out to you through our contact page.

Keeping Kids Safe While Riding in a Boat

In some ways, the pleasure of riding in a boat can bring out the kid in all of us. Children are naturally drawn to water and riding in a boat is undeniably fun. Owners and operators of boats who plan to take children aboard still need to think carefully about how to best keep their little passengers safe during the trip. Here are a few basic principles:
  1. Comply with floatation device requirements.

In Nevada every boat must carry life jackets that comply with U.S. Coast Guard (USCG) guidelines for personal flotation devices (PFDs). There are a number of specific rules for PFDs.
  • Every boat must carry at least one life jacket per passenger. Larger vessels (16 feet or larger) must carry additional floatation equipment. When considering whether sufficient PFDs are on board, take into account the size requirements of different passengers. Children and infants have very different sizing and fit requirements when compared to adults.
  • Children under 13 years of age are required to wear a PFD at all times while a vessel is underway unless the child is fully confined inside the boat. A child may not need to wear a life jacket while below deck on a sail boat, but would need to wear one on a power boat with only a partial enclosure.
  • Life jackets need to be in good condition. If a life jacket has a damaged buckle or frayed material it should be replaced.
  • Life jackets must be legibly marked with the applicable USCG approval number.
  • PFDs must be accessible, which means that it is being worn or can be reached and is ready to wear. A life jacket that’s kept in a box, especially if the box is locked, doesn’t meet this requirement.
  1. Know your passengers.

Take a moment to find out how much experience your young passengers have with boats. Children who have never ridden on a boat before probably don’t know what to expect if, for example, the boat hits waves while under power. Know whether your passengers can swim so that you can anticipate the kind of intervention that might be required in an emergency.
  1. Talk about boat safety.

Children should be taught how to respond in the event of an emergency on the water. In a real emergency, such as if the boat flips over or the child falls overboard, an adult may not be able to reach the child right away. Especially on boats that are prone to tipping (canoes, sail boats) it’s important to teach children to stay with the boat in the event of a capsize. Have a plan if the child falls overboard. Ideally, the child has spent time in the water wearing a lifejacket, so he or she knows what to expect.

GGRM is a Las Vegas personal injury law firm

For over 45 years the attorneys at Greenman Goldberg Raby Martinez have represented clients in the Las Vegas area in personal injury cases. If you have been injured in a boating accident we are happy to discuss your case with you. Call today for a free attorney consultation at 702-388-4476 or request a call through our website.

Seeking Compensation for Child Abuse

A child who suffers emotional or physical abuse can endure both short- and long-term consequences, from injuries requiring medical care to lasting emotional and psychological trauma. In many cases child abuse is a crime. It can also be grounds for filing a civil lawsuit against the abuser to recover compensation for the child’s care. The nature of a lawsuit filed against an alleged child abuser will depend on a range of factors. These will include:
  • The identity of the abuser. Was the abuse by a parent or caregiver, or was the abuser someone outside the home?
  • The nature and severity of the abuse (physical versus purely emotional abuse, sexual versus nonsexual abuse).
  • The identity of the potential plaintiffs, which might include parents or legal guardians suing on behalf of their child, or the child suing directly.
A key question in any abuse trial will be the availability of physical evidence to prove that the abuse took place and that the defendant was responsible. In cases of physical abuse this might include testimony from medical professionals who treated the child immediately after abuse-related injuries. It might also include photographs and testimony from anyone who can confirm seeing visible signs of injury. Evidence of emotional abuse may have similar contours. In cases of emotional abuse, it can often be helpful to have evidence of the child’s psychological state before the abuse occurred as a way to show how much harm the abuse caused. When a child has been abused it is often vitally important to take steps to prevent the abuse from happening again. Plaintiffs can seek protective orders to restrict the abuser’s access to the child, and should consider reporting the incident to law enforcement and the Nevada Division of Child and Family Services. Parents are sometimes reluctant to seek help through these official channels for a variety of reasons, including fears that a governmental agency may seek to take the abused child away from the home. An attorney can help parents resolve these questions. The timing of a lawsuit that arises from child abuse is an important consideration for potential plaintiffs. Under Nevada law most types of personal injury cases must be filed with the court within two years of the injury. Nevada law provides an exception for plaintiffs who were minors at the time of the wrongful action. In such cases the two year period will only begin to run once the victim-plaintiff turns eighteen (in legal terms, the statute of limitations is “tolled” or paused). There is also a greater period of time granted for victims of childhood sexual abuse. Last year the Nevada legislature extended the statute of limitations for lawsuits arising from sexual abuse of a minor from ten to twenty years. NRS 11.215. The law firm of Greenman Goldberg Raby Martinez has represented clients in personal injury cases for over 45 years. If you or a loved one has suffered from child abuse and you would like to better understand your legal options, call us today for a free, confidential attorney consultation. We’re available at 702-388-4476 or contact us through our website.

What to Do After an Accident with a Semi-Truck

Accidents with large commercial vehicles like semi-trucks can be especially dangerous for people in passenger vehicles. The weight and size disparity between a truck and an ordinary car can leave the car badly mangled and the people inside severely injured. For the driver of the truck such accidents not only threaten personal injury but can also put a career at risk. After being in an accident with a commercial vehicle there are a number of steps a driver should take:
  • Get medical attention. Anytime someone is injured in an accident the first step is always to ensure that injuries are stabilized. If possible, tell nurses and doctors about the accident. The information gathered by medical professionals about the nature of the injury can become vital evidence in future litigation.
  • Get the truck driver’s details. Like any car accident, the drivers involved in a wreck involving a commercial vehicle should exchange contact information and share insurance details.
  • Get the name and contact information of the driver’s employer. In addition to finding out the name of the truck driver, it’s important to also find out the name of the driver’s employer and get as much information as possible about the employer. Chances are good that the driver’s insurance is carried by the employer, not the driver personally, and any lawsuit that follows the accident will probably name the employer as a defendant.
  • Report the accident. Nevada law requires parties involved in an accident to report the incident to the Department of Motor Vehicles. In crashes where police were involved in the initial post-accident response this report may not be required, as the police prepare the necessary paperwork as part of their process. The insurance companies of both drivers should also be contacted.
  • Consult with an accident attorney. Even if a driver’s insurance carrier will be pursuing legal action on behalf of the driver, it’s often important to have independent legal counsel. Insurance companies have an inherent conflict of interest whenever a claim arises: their profits depend on denying claims and aggressively seeking reimbursement for any costs they incur. Even if the insurer’s interests are aligned with the injured driver’s, the driver should have independent advice to protect against unlawful or dishonest behavior by the insurer.
Accidents involving commercial drivers typically open questions about the legal relationship of the truck driver with the business for which he or she was driving at the time of the accident. Truck drivers may fall into one of several categories:
  • Sole proprietors who operate the truck as a business and are personally liable for damages caused in an accident.
  • Independent contractors who are working for another business. Independent contractors may be treated as sole proprietors from a legal liability standpoint, but their liability will be subject to the terms of their relationship with the “client” business.
  • Employees of a trucking company.
Regardless of the legal form of the relationship between the truck driver and the trucking business, the injured plaintiff’s attorneys will probably seek compensation from the business as well as, or instead of, the truck’s driver. The business may have good arguments for why it is not responsible for the driver’s negligence, but in a typical situation a business is responsible for the wrongdoing of its agents, regardless of whether the agents are independent contractors or employees.

GGRM is a Las Vegas accident law firm

The law firm of Greenman Goldberg Raby Martinez has represented clients in auto accident cases for over 45 years. If you have been injured in an accident involving a commercial vehicle, please give us a call today for a free attorney consultation. We can be reached at 702-388-4476 or through our contacts page.

Falling Furniture Can Seriously Injure Small Children

In recent years a series of recalls has brought to light the serious risk that furniture can pose to small children. Ikea has issued recalls for its Malm series of low-cost dressers, which the company says pose an unreasonable risk of toppling over if a child climbs on them. The recalls came after the eighth child was killed by a dresser in the Malm line falling on top of them.

Take steps to make your home more safe

Everyone, not just parents of small children, should give some consideration to the potential risks of furniture tipping over in their homes. The recalled Ikea dresser is only one example of “tippy” furniture. Another common source of serious injuries is modern TV sets. Modern televisions are quite large, and though they tend to be lighter than obsolete tube-based units they can still cause serious harm if they tip over onto someone. Fortunately there are simple steps that people can take to make their homes more safe. Securing tippy furniture doesn’t necessarily require making every piece of furniture impossible to move. The key is to ensure that if the furniture does tip over the anchor breaks the fall. Here are some suggestions:
  • Secure furniture and other heavy objects to anchor points, such as shelves that are firmly secured to walls or by using drywall anchors that are rated to handle the weight of the anchored object.
  • Mount flat-screen televisions on the wall instead of using tabletop stands.
  • Make sure to repair damaged furniture, especially if the damage could make the furniture more likely to fall over.
  • Supervise small children who might be prone to climbing bookshelves or open drawers. If necessary, put up gates to restrict access to dangerous rooms.

Pay attention to recalls

One reason the Ikea case is significant is the sheer number of the affected dressers. Because they are inexpensive the dressers are very common, meaning they frequently show up for sale on Craigslist and other informal channels. Even if they are available for free, consumers should not bring these dangerous items into their homes. If a product poses an unreasonable risk to consumers the manufacturer and marketers of the product may be subject to a products liability lawsuit. Retailers like Ikea try to avoid this liability by issuing recalls, which do not absolve the company of responsibility but can serve to mitigate the company’s risk. Customers who know about a recall but choose to ignore it may be considered to have assumed the risk of injury, and therefore may have difficulty recovering compensation from a company like Ikea if a recalled piece of furniture causes serious injury. People who keep furniture that poses known risks around their homes may also increase their risk of facing a lawsuit by a guest who is injured by the dangerous furniture. Homeowners can bear legal liability for injuries that occur within the home. Even if a homeowner’s or renter’s insurance policy will assume some of the costs associated with defending against such a claim, this is not a position anyone should want to be in.

Have you been injured by falling furniture?

For over 45 years the law firm of Greenman Goldberg Raby Martinez has helped clients in Las Vegas pursue products liability and personal injury claims. If you have been injured by furniture falling over and you would like to explore pursuing compensation from a manufacturer or other responsible person, we are happy to talk through your options. Call us today for a free attorney consultation. We can be reached at 702-388-4476 or send us a request through our site.