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Tools for Proving Brain Injury

Before a plaintiff in a personal injury case can recover compensation, he or she must prove that the injury exists, and that it was caused by the defendant’s wrongful actions. The existence and scope of many kinds of injury can be proven in straightforward ways: a broken bone can be proven with an x-ray, a burn can be proven with photos of scars, and so on. Brain injuries can be more difficult to prove, because they aren’t always visible and the technology that can reveal changes to a brain’s structure is not readily understood by people outside the medical industry.

Physical proof of brain injury

Some forms of traumatic brain injury can be revealed in much the same way as a broken arm. Advances in medical imaging technologies allow astonishing detail to be reduced to photographs that can be admitted as evidence at trial. There are a number of tools available to capture images of the brain’s structure. These include computed tomography (CT) scans, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), and positron emission tomography (PET) scans. Each of these technologies reveal different things, ranging from an MRI’s three-dimensional picture to a DTI’s microscopic analysis.

There are challenges associated with using evidence from these scans. The first is that they need to be available at all. In some cases the injured plaintiff doesn’t have access to these technologies, or the access was not timely enough. A second problem is that an untrained person often can’t tell when an image shows damage to a brain. Therefore expert witnesses are often required to help the court interpret the output of the scans. Whenever expert witnesses are involved there’s always a possibility that the defense will bring their own experts to contest the testimony of the plaintiff’s experts. Issues like these can be overcome by experienced personal injury attorneys, but they can complicate a case.

Proving brain injury when physical proof isn’t definitive

Modern scanning technology doesn’t always provide a definitive answer to what is happening in the brain. In many cases the output of a given scan may be interpreted in multiple ways, leaving significant doubt about the existence of the injury. Despite the apparent lack of “photographic” evidence, the person suffering from such injuries knows that something is wrong.

A common approach in such cases is to present evidence of how the plaintiff’s life has changed as a consequence of the injury. Doing this requires building a narrative of change by developing a picture of how the plaintiff behaved before the injury and how that behavior has changed. The plaintiff’s friends, family, and coworkers may be good references. In the age of cell phone video, a plaintiff may have a lot of video to show, for example, that a particular speech impediment was not present before the accident. The plaintiff’s health care providers are often crucially important witnesses in such cases.

Talk to an experienced personal injury law firm about your case

The law firm of Greenman Goldberg Raby Martinez has represented clients in personal injury cases for over 45 years. We are committed to providing each client with personal attention and care. If you have suffered a brain injury and need help sorting through your legal options, please contact us today for a free attorney consultation. We can be reached at 702-388-4476 or through our contacts page.