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Workers’ Compensation Lawyers in Las Vegas Explain How to Protect Your Teen at a Summer Job

Teen Summer Job

As an adult, you probably appreciate the tenet, “The best way to learn a job is to do the job.” Many adults tend to view that tenet a little differently when their teen is starting their first summer job. What parent doesn’t want to protect their teen from harm?

Take it from any workers’ compensation lawyer in Las Vegas at Greenman, Goldberg, Raby and Martinez: that tenet has lasting value. But, considering the Occupational Safety and Health Administration report an astounding 70,000 teens are injured on the job and require medical treatment every year, it pays to prepare teens for some of the issues you know lie ahead.

A workers’ compensation lawyer in Las Vegas knows: Some duties are prohibited by age

No matter what an employer may tell your teen, certain tasks and jobs are prohibited by age. For example:

Teens under 18 cannot:

  • Work where chemicals or explosives are manufactured.
  • Operate a motor vehicle.
  • Operate many large pieces of heavy equipment.

Teens ages 14 and 15, who are working with a permit, cannot:

  • Bake or cook (though they can work at a service counter).
  • Operate machinery.
  • Work on ladders or scaffolding.
  • Unload trucks or work on a conveyor belt.

Teens should prepare and be proactive

Some of these references may sound severe if “all” your teen is doing this summer is scanning items and collecting money at a register, stocking shelves or serving in a customer service capacity.

Take it from any workers’ compensation lawyer in Las Vegas: every workplace (just like every home) poses safety hazards – from slippery floors to rickety staircases. When the environment is new and unfamiliar, the risks can compound exponentially.

Tell your teen to mitigate hazards before starting a job by:

  • Undergoing required training sessions.
  • Reading the company’s employee manual. This will almost certainly be a “dry read” for a teen, but most manuals contain a few surprises about rules and procedures teens should be glad to know ahead of time.
  • Learning the company’s emergency procedures.
  • If it’s not offered, asking for a “practice run” through a normal shift.

Tell your teen to mitigate hazards after starting a job by:

  • Staying constantly alert to their surroundings and telling you immediately if anything – a coworker’s behavior, a boss’ request, an accident – seems unusual or troublesome.
  • Wearing the required uniform.
  • Listening carefully to instructions.
  • Asking questions whenever a directive or request is unclear.
  • Following all safety rules.
  • Reporting any workplace safety hazards to a supervisor.
  • Contact the workers’ compensation lawyers in Las Vegas

    If your teen wants to earn “extra credit” in your book for preparation, have them watch a workplace video tailored to their job. Better yet, watch the video with your teen and discuss it afterward. The workers’ compensation lawyers in Las Vegas at Greenman, Goldberg, Raby and Martinez would agree with you “the best way to learn a job is to do the job.” But preparation will go a long way toward keeping your teen safe all summer long. Contact GGRM at 702-388-4476 for a free consultation today.

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